Balloon Catheter for managing Cardiac Arrest and Hemorrhage

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cardiac
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Cardiac arrest, i.e. the sudden loss of heart function, is one of the leading causes of death around the world. During the event, the heart loses the capability to pump blood around the body, leading to damage of the vital organs, including itself and the brain – even if life is preserved.

Currently, physicians temporarily manage cardiac arrests through CPR, chest compressions, and defibrillations until they can get the patient to the operating table. Once there, a stent or implant can be placed as a permanent treatment.


However, according to Neurescue’s CEO Dr. Habib Frost, the current temporary management techniques are not very efficient


“Today’s CPR only replaces 35% of blood flow to the heart and the brain, which is not high enough to resuscitate the majority of patients and does not provide enough time to successfully bridge most patients to advanced definitive treatments,” he explains.


His experiences of losing cardiac arrest patients during medical school made him realize that this was a problem he wanted to solve. Enter, the Neurescue system.

A new way to manage Cardiac Arrest


Neurescue, a name homonymous with the company that created it, is an aortic occlusion device that can help increase blood flow to vital organs. It is designed as a balloon catheter that can be placed via the femoral artery and inflated once it reaches the desired point. It is guided through an attached control unit which inflates the balloon itself using its sensors and feedback system. This prevents overinflation or rupture of the balloon and the arteries.


This control unit enables physicians to place the device without fluoroscopy. This means that doctors can perform this emergency procedure anywhere, even outside the hospital.


Dr. Frost claims that Neurescue is built to buy responders more time compared to traditional techniques. It can give them at least one hour to get their patient into surgery.


Apart from cardiac arrest events, Neurescue has also designed its system to save hemorrhagic patients from bleeding out. Their device has received an Investigational Device Exemption from the FDA. The company now plans on starting its clinical trial in the US after enrolling voluntary participants.

Source: Medgadget
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1CfqqsbdBdJiD_CCGzaUrOyLvfq9O0Q2UKEPq3wSzz8Y/edit#gid=438843087

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